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Why I still love Youtube

Why I still love YoutubeIf you’re part of my Small & Supercharged or Small & Supercharged VIP group, or if you’ve just seen my Tip Tuesdays on Facebook and Instagram, you might have picked up on my ‘thing’ for posting video natively. But if I’m nuts on native content, does that mean I’ve fallen out of love with Youtube? Nope. Not even a bit. YouTube still has a very prominent place in my social media heart.

Why YouTube -surely Facebook wins?

Saying Facebook is better than YouTube (or visa versa), in my mind, is like saying Spiderman is better than Batman. They’re both good. They’re both really good. But they’re both quite different and you want both to have your back, don’t you?

I make a vlog a week for YouTube and create content for it – have a look at my channel here (and if you’d like to give me a little subscribe, I would love that too). The content I create for my channel often gets shared on Twitter and Instagram, and on Facebook too, but I know if I want to get maximum eyeballs on my video (in contrast to drive traffic to YouTube), I need to upload natively to Facebook too. I did produce a lot of content this way and will start on a new content plan for this. Uploading natively to Facebook gives you more options and it just works better TO THE FACEBOOK AUDIENCE. But uploading just onto Facebook and ignoring Youtube isn’t a great plan.

Why bother with YouTube? Everyone is on Facebook!

Well, yes and no. The platforms are very, very different. So, Facebook has over 1.9 billion users per month. That’s phenomenal. BUT over a billion people use YouTube, and it’s the second largest search engine in the world with some other amazing facts around it too. People use both platforms for different things. If you’re looking to ask a specific question – maybe how to do something, or you’re looking to research something, I bet you’d go for YouTube over Facebook? Yes? So why wouldn’t you put your content over on YouTube, so it’s there when people are looking for it? Yes, posting natively to Facebook is good. But so is posting to YouTube. And that’s why I still love it.

 

Does posting natively increase your reach?

does posting natively increase your reachDoes posting natively increase your reach? Well, there are a few things to consider here – and a few points were raised in a previous blog about context and content… but let’s dive in.

What do you mean by ‘posting natively’?

Posting direct to the platform and not making people move around to view content. This works with blogs, vlogs and links to websites. And I get the irony that this is a blog and has been promoted on my social media platforms. But you’ll notice how that even though the blog isn’t native to the platforms I’m promoting it on, I’m creating native content to promote the blog… did you see a graphic on Facebook or did you just see a boring old link with no imagery? I hope you saw the graphic that I uploaded to Facebook so I could combine the benefits of the native posting with the benefits of bringing you here to my little corner of the internet.

Does posting natively increase reach?

Yep. And this is two fold. Thinking of Facebook, it’s said (and in my experience this is correct!), that the algorithm prefers native content. And why wouldn’t it? Watching stuff natively on the platform and not venturing off to other sites is a win for any website. Even when you’re as big as Facebook. For the consumer too, you click it, you watch it, you get bored, you move on. You don’t have to open and close tabs to get back to where you were. And the other reason that native posting can increase reach is simply because it looks a whole lot better in the feed. This means it looks a LOT more interesting and will encourage a lot more engagement.

Should I only post natively?

Yes and no. If you take the example of video, you might be looking to develop your Youtube channel, but want to use your Facebook page to help promote your videos. So what do you do? There are a few options. You can just post a link to your video on Facebook and hope for the best, fully aware that it doesn’t look half as good as a native post and that the reach will be less – but it will link to Youtube and you’ll get your views there. You could post an image from the video natively and also post the link to the video. It looks visually more inviting and you still drive people in the right direction. You create a short ‘trailer’ and post that video natively and include the link to Youtube. You post natively to Facebook. By which I mean you post the WHOLE video natively to Facebook and, if you like, to Youtube. If your objective is views, wherever they come from, this can work well.

Here’s just one example of how posting natively can increase your reach – what do you think? How did you do it? I’d love to hear…

Video alert – can you make something negative, positive?

It’s video time! In this video I’m talking all about how you can make something negative, positive – well, how you can take negative feedback generated by a faulty product and turn into a positive. How you can turn this into a great PR opportunity? Does it sound a bit far fetched? I don’t think so…

Is it really possible?

It honestly depends on a number of factors but I think in most cases it can be IF it’s handled properly. I say most cases because it obviously does depend on the ‘damage’ something has caused, this can be a variable and can mean that your task is incredibly difficult if not impossible. However, when I created this video I was thinking more about popular products that we buy that can leave us disappointed, something like clothing or footwear. I’m not talking dodgy seatbelts here. I’m looking at the kind of products that most people sell online.

Any other caveats?

Yes. The dodgy product needs to be unusual. If all your products are substandard you’re basically firefighting and you can’t win long term because everyone is going to be peed off with you because you’ve let them down.

But what about social media?

Yep. Social media has changed the game in this area. Previously people would call the company or email them first – or even take it back to the shop they bought it from – and would follow the correct complaints procedure. Now they take to social media. If you’re lucky they’ll send you a message, but they might just post that you’re Satan on your Facebook page and that they’re bitterly disappointed/the product is cheap and rubbish/they hate you. Before you become a keyboard warrior too, just take a breath. It can be really frustrating and it makes you wonder if you should bother trying to turn this negative into a positive but you should. Honestly. Even if they don’t respond how you’d like, your other customers will see that you’re trying – in some cases they might come to your defence (I’ve seen this happen before…). Acknowledge their message and suggest they DM you or email you with additional information to try and remove the discussion from public view. This has the obvious benefit but also allows you to ask them personal details that they shouldn’t disclose in public. Be nice to them. Try and help them. Obviously you must follow your company’s complaints procedure, but do it in a nice way. If you say you’ll get back to them by a date – DO – even if you have to say you’re still waiting. Keep them informed. Be honest. Be genuine. Be understanding. If you can, send them a goodwill gesture. You’ll be amazed at how these ‘haters’ can become your biggest cheerleaders if treated kindly and respectfully by someone who wants to help them.

Of course, no one should ever be happy with selling substandard products, but sometimes things slip through the net- I’ve had clothes shrink, boots split and all manner of things as I am sure you have. These things happen and people do generally understand. And if you’re nice to them, you might have got yourself a lifelong brand ambassador too.

If you liked this, you might like this blog here – all about turning a negative or fault products into a good PR opportunity.

Video content: How to make video work hard for you

This blog is all about how to make video content work hard for you. Because, let’s be honest, it needs to. Making a video takes time, and if you pay to have it edited, it costs your money too. And that’s what I’ve created a video and a blog post about how to make video content work hard for you.

The video is on Youtube, and if you click on the image, you can watch the video.

How to make video content work hard – eight steps

Actually, let’s use the video above as an example of how to make content work hard for you. So, the start of this is the video. I created the video on my iPhone (so, no extra cost to me), and I did pay my husband to edit it because, well, he does this as part of his job and I like to have my logo on it in the right places. That didn’t cost me a huge amount, but it’s still a cost. So, step one… the video is on Youtube. Great. The video will stay on here forever (well, until I take it down) and it’ll be getting views until that point. Great. People can find it by searching for it.

Step two, in this case, is this blog. This blog, with the video embedded in it, will sit on my blog, on my website. It’ll help my SEO (due to the blog around the video), it’ll provide useful content for people viewing my website, it’s a solid step two.

Step three, sharing. I’ll share the blog with the video on my social media. By which I mean my business Facebook page, LinkedIn, Instagram, Pinterest and Twitter. I might also share it in some of the business groups I’m involved with on Facebook.

Step four, native posting. I’ll then post the video natively to Facebook. Not the same week as I post the blog, but I will. And I’ll subtitle it so it works when people view Facebook on silent and autoplay kicks in.

Step five, I’ll share the Youtube link straight onto all my social media platforms. This won’t be in the near future, but I’ll post the link to Youtube on its own, without the blog content, so people can view it and visit my Youtube channel.

Step six, I’ll share it with my newsletter subscribers, so they get to see the blog and the video. Well, so they know it’s there. I’ll share a link to the blog for those who fancy a read, and I’ll embed the video too.

Step seven, if someone asks me a question about how to make content work hard, I’ll use this blog and my video as a resource that I can send them.

Step eight, in a few months, I could well do this all over again, when people have long forgotten about the blog. Or I might share it again when there’s a relevant news story about it.

And believe me when I say that depending on the social networks you use and the business you have, there are plenty more ways to make your content work really hard for you. Maybe you can use your video at shows you attend? Burnt onto a DVD for prospective customers? As a part of a resource pack for retailers selling your product? To help add another level of customer service, to help reduce the amount of time you spent troubleshooting or giving customers phone tutorials? Honestly, we’re just scratching the surface here.

If you’ve ever wondered how to make your video content work hard for you, but you’e still not sure how to make it work in your situation, why not drop me a line?

 

My first vlog- why am I doing this?

I know I’ve been a bit (OK, more than a bit!) rubbish at keeping this blog up to date – but I feel I’ve made up for it. Not JUST a blog – a vlog. And there will be more to come. Enjoy!

 

Happy New Year!

It seems like forever since I’ve blogged on my own site…and looking at the date of my last post, that’s very much the case! The truth is that I’ve been so busy working with my clients across various media that my own ‘stuff’ seems to have taken a bit of backseat – and for those snippets of news I want to share, I write on my Facebook page…so if you’d like to hear what’s going on with my lovely bunch of clients, the Rhea Freeman PR Facebook page is your best bet! I’m hoping and planning to do more blogs this year, but as they’re usually more in-depth and ramble on (!), they take a wee bit more time! Hope to see you on the RFPR Facebook page!

I would, however, like to take this opportunity to wish you all a very happy, healthy and successful 2016. I do think that people put too much focus on the ‘new year, new you’ idea. If you want to change, then just crack on! If you’re looking to improve your business, spread your message, increase your profits, get more people talking about you and what you do, don’t let a silly date stop you or, worse still, put so much pressure on you that you set yourself up for a fall and become completely demoralised! If you want to have a booming business by the end of the year, then don’t wait to start promoting yourself, and don’t set yourself huge goals without thinking how you’re actually going to achieve them. It’s just depressing if you don’t have a vague plan! You don’t need to spend the national debt on ads, you can start small by getting yourself organised on social media, filming yourself or your product and posting these clips, getting a tried and tested in a magazine. Setting little, achievable goals is more do-able, a hell of a lot easier, and forms a great foundation to build a more joined up campaign. So, if this New Year is all about building yourself a better, bigger business, remember that there are very few overnight successes…but there are many perceived overnight success stories that have come from years of hard work!