Customer Experience

Customer experience isn’t just about selling a product to people. Oh no. With a good, well thought through customer experience, your customers can become your advocates, ambassadors and more without you paying them a penny. And they’ll keep coming back too! Not because they have to, because they want to. And they’ll bring people with them!

In my opinion, making this experience the best you possibly can is a great way to make a small business stand out from the big boys. There are many areas that as a small business you might struggle to compete on. But this is an area you can absolutely ace!

Running an online only business with Ruth Chappell- Small & Supercharged Podcast

You’re in for a treat today! On this episode of the Small & Supercharged podcast we catch up with Ruth Chappell, the lady behind Dressage Anywhere. In addition to being a huge part of Dressage Anywhere, Ruth has a lot of strings to her bow. She’s an absolute superstar and is also a ‘tech wizard’. In this episode, we chat about how Ruth got to this point, the difficulties with running a digital, online equestrian business and more.

Let’s talk about online equestrian businesses and how to create a digital business, with Ruth Chappell – Dressage Anywhere

Show notes for the Small & Supercharged Podcast – Episode 8 – online only equestrian businesses, how to deal with competition, cyber security and making a connection with customers…

  • Ruth talks about how she came to Dressage Anywhere, the online dressage platform
  • We talk about competition and how to deal with being the only online dressage company to how it is now.
  • We spoke about where the idea for Dressage Anywhere came from.
  • The benefits of an online business, the international appeal and global reach the business has.
  • How Dressage Anywhere actually works.
  • The limitations of being an online/digital business and how this can be quite challenging.
  • The opportunities that social media has presented for digital businesses.
  • Particular highlights including the Riding for the Disabled Association.
  • Some of the tools that Ruth uses to help run Dressage Anywhere effectively.
  • Social media content for digital businesses and how this can be used to help promote connection and business.
  • Finding friends and amazing connections through social media.
  • We talk about cyber security and data protection, and how that even a small business needs to be aware of this and understand the responsibilities connected to it.
  • And we talk about user experience, customer journey, automation, and balancing tech with usability… because they have to work together.

It was an absolute joy chatting to Ruth – not only do I love Dressage Anywhere, but I am a huge Ruth fan. She is a fountain of knowledge on ‘techy’ things and has helped me out on more than one occasion when I’ve had a tech based ‘why does everything hate me’ meltdown. OK. That happens quite a lot!

To find Ruth and Dressage Anywhere online, follow the links below…

Dressage Anywhere website

Twitter

Instagram

Facebook

Beautiful image provided by Karen Bennett Photography

Subscribe to the Small & Supercharged podcast on iTunes

When Instagram Face Filters changed the game – Kylie Jenner

As I was looking through Instagram Stories on Friday night, something caught my eye. I was watching Jasmine Star’s Insta Stories and under her name it said the filter she was using. The Face Filter to be precise. What was strange was that I hadn’t noticed she was using a filter. And that was kind of the point. This was no ordinary Instagram Face Filter. This was an Instagram Face Filter by Kylie Jenner. And, for me, it’s really changed the game on filters.

What’s an Instagram Face Filter?

First things first, if you’re not sure what I mean by Instagram Face Filter, let me explain. Have you seen people on Instagram Stories with dog ears and rainbows and other craziness on their faces? Yep? Instagram Kylie Jenner Face Filter - augmented reality (1)That’s a Face Filter. They’re usually comical in some way and it’s very, very obvious that one’s in use. But this was different. It wasn’t like that at all.

Kylie Jenner

I am sure you don’t need me to tell you who Kylie Jenner is… but I’m going to because if you don’t know then the next bit of this blog is going to make very little sense to you! Kylie is part of the Kardashian clan, and she has her own make up collection. As you’ll know if you follow me on Instagram or Facebook, I have no idea about make up. It’s more luck than judgement that I know about her make up range, but I digress…

So what’s the Kylie Face Filter?

It’s a form of augmented reality and an absolute stroke of marketing genius in my opinion. I had a jaw dropping moment when I realised what the filter did and how it worked. So, unlike comical filters, the Kylie Face Filter makes you look, well, really quite good. But it’s more than that. Inside the Kylie filter you can chose from one of eight different looks with the central focus being the lip colour. These eight different options show a range of colours and are, wait for it, based on her lip colour collection. This sounds good – I mean, when I discovered it I was pretty tired and I was not looking my best…. and this filter definitely improved things, put it that way. But it’s SO much more than this. I really believe that this is part of the future of marketing. Want to know how make up is going to look on your with your colouring? Easy. How about furniture in your house? Clothes? All from your phone. Even through on of your favourite apps?

The one obstacle in the way of shopping online has always been that you can’t really see the products and how they’ll look on you through a computer screen. With this kind of technology being used, can you imagine the scope? Can you imagine the potential?

Blummin well done Instagram. Another absolute triumph in my eyes. And I for one can not wait to see how augmented reality grows in this accesible way.

How to… pick fonts to represent your brand

how to pick fonts to represent your brandFonts can be a game changer when it comes to a logo or brand identity. In all honesty, the biggest change between my old logo and my new one is fonts that were used. Picking fonts to represent your brand can be challenging, but the good thing is that if you get the right one, it can make a HUGE difference.

How do you pick fonts to represent your brand?

I start with magazines, Pinterest and searching the web. There are a LOT of fonts available, a huge amount in fact. These go through fashions, like all design does, and more are being added all the time. There are a few different kinds of font family:

Serif type fonts – these are generally older style fonts and tend to have small lines at the tops and bottoms of the letters. A good example is the Word favourite Times Roman. When I say ‘older style’, there’s nothing wrong with using older style fonts at all. They can show heritage, knowledge and tradition when used correctly. Baskerville is a really nice example of a font that works really well today. You’ll see it’s classic and elegant but not old fashioned. Have a Google!

Sans Serif type fonts- sans means ‘without’ in French, so you’ll find a sans serif font doesn’t have the little extra bits. Generally these fonts are seen as a little bit more modern and feel a lot more curvy and round because there are no extra lines. This can make them feel soft and friendly too. Arial is a popular example of this (again, a Word favourite!), Avant Garde is another good one.

Script types fonts- should make you feel like they have a handwritten quality, even though they’re obviously more uniform than handwriting. They tend to flow and feel approachable too. The font I use for ‘Rhea Freeman’ is a hand lettering script font, but my previous one, Lobster, is also a Script font.

Decorative fonts- usually more elaborate than a Script font and can look incredible if used carefully. Some of the decorative fonts are not that easy to read (of course. some are!), but they should be used with caution in branding… in my opinion. Pick the right decorative font and it can work really well, but there are many caveats.

How to pick the fonts

So now you know the different font families (and it is useful because now you know what you’re Googling!), think about how you might use them. My logo is made up of two fonts – a premium handlettering font called Winsome and Oswald, and I use another font for my website copy. This means I can use these fonts in different ways on my website, social media graphics, etc etc. Size is important as, especially with a decorative or script font, if it’s too small, you won’t be able to see it. And if the person who is reading your website can’t actually read it, you might have the most beautiful font in the work and it won’t do the job!

But how do I know which fonts represent my brand?

Well, you need to think about the values of your brand, your customer avatar (and what they like and expect) and lots more. Some fonts sit better with different kinds of jobs – you’d expect a solicitor to have a very bold, easy to read, no nonsense font. This doesn’t mean it can’t be a premium font or even bespoke. This works with the values of the brand, the serious nature of the business and more. But if you’re an artist or more creative, a more decorative font can help you express your creativity in a way that doesn’t undermine your work… see what I mean?

A good place to start is to look at the kind of fonts that similar businesses use. You’ll probably see a pattern in the families they use and the styles. You don’t have to do the same, but it’s a useful reference point and place to start.

A word of warning about fonts

Less is more. There are so many beautiful fonts available that it can be really hard to pick which to use. The good news is you can use more than one font in your branding, but these need to a) work together and b) be limited. Too many fonts can confuse a message, and fonts that clash rather than complement can feel amateur and a bit manic… which no business wants!

 

Can you repost professional photographs on social media?

Can you repost professional photographs on social media?

Quote image by Sophie Callahan Photography.

In a fairly recently Monday Q and A on my Facebook page, I received a variation of this question: ‘can you repost professional photographs on social media?’. Now, I want to put this into context a little. The person who posted was asking about a rider that they sponsor. The rider had added what was clearly a professionally taken image to their social media media. So does that mean that the company can repost it? Well no, not necessarily.

Can you repost professional photographs on social media?

If I was giving a one word answer, that would be no. If, in the case above, a rider has posted a professional picture on social media, this doesn’t mean you can automatically. Even if the rider has asked permission for the photographer and this has been granted, this doesn’t automatically mean you can…

So, first of all, your rider might not have the proper permission. Many people buy prints and take pics of the prints and then post these. This isn’t right. Often, photographers will provide social media images (that can be purchased for not much money) that CAN be used on social media. Some photographers add this in a package when someone buys a print. They all don’t but some do.

Now, even if the above has been done properly, that does not mean that you as a business can repost without permission. I mean, people do, let’s be honest about this, but you need to reach out to the photographer and get their written permission for this. Some may request further payment… you don’t have to pay this. But if you decide not to pay it, do NOT repost the image. Please. It’s not good. Many photographers are happy, if the image has been purchased correctly and you credit it to let you use it on your social media. I did speak to a few photographers about this and they agreed.

What about sharing a picture?

Sharing an image from the original source is a bit different. If the photographer has posted the image and you share direct, then technically there shouldn’t be an issue here (as long as you SHARE the image, you don’t screenshot or save the image and then post as your own). Some photographers do explain on their page that they do not want this done, and some confirm that they’re happy if images are shared but no saved and posted. Respect this.

Sharing and reposting are very very different animals. Sharing and retweeting show the original source clearly… reposting should (if you use the correct apps) but doesn’t in the same way. You also move the image from the photographer (or rider’s) feed to your own and post it natively there.

If a rider has shared an image from a photographer with a watermark across it… don’t share it. Again, USUALLY, when an image has been purchased properly, the watermark is removed. This isn’t always the case for social media images but generally it is.

And what if the photograph is really good?

It doesn’t matter how good it is. If it doubt (any doubt!) always ask. Always.

Are photographers just being mean?

Sometimes you’ll find a really grumpy photographer, just like you’ll find really grumpy INSERT ANY OTHER PROFESSION HERE. But this? No, this is their livelihood. And as far as I’m aware, not that many banks take goodwill in lieu of a mortgage payment. Of course, if the image has already been purchased once (important point!), it’s to promote the rider, they sponsor the rider, or various other situations, you’re more than likely to get a ‘yes, no problem’ response. But if you don’t ask… well… you could really annoy a photographer and could be charged too.

How to make the most of your time at Badminton Horse Trials

With Badminton very much here, I wanted to share with you some of my top tips, to help you make the most of your time at Badminton Horse Trials. This is a truly AMAZING event and I can’t wait to go this year, but trust me on this, prior planning prevents poor performance. Sounds like a military operation, doesn’t it? It isn’t, but I have found my enjoyment for events has been increased 10 fold by following the advice below. It’s a bit like like advice your mum would give. But I’m doing it clad in Hiho Silver, my Mackenzie & George Fedora and my Fairfax & Favor Explorers. Horse Trials uniform if you will… so here goes…

How to make the most of your time at Badminton Horse Trials…

1. Organise. I know, I know, it’s such a boring tip, but it’s a big one. Get all your clothes organised the night before. Locate your purse/bag/car keys/ticket THE NIGHT BEFORE. Do everything the night before. Make a list of stuff you need and put as much of it in a heap by the door or even in the car. This might mean poo bags and leads if you’re taking a dog, waterproofs and umbrellas or sunscreen. Give yourself a little time to think and plan… it’ll save you running around in the morning and increasing stress levels before you get into the car.

2. Maps. Ah. Another piece of parental advice. If you have stands you HAVE to see, print off a map of the tradestands from the Badminton website and get them marked on with a pen. When you’re there, you’ll thank me. You’ll move around in a much more efficient manner, saving miles on your boots and also saving you lots of time.

** Make sure you add Hiho Silver on stand 188 – you can see the Official Mitsubishi Motors Badminton Horse Trials Jewellery Collection there, Mackenzie & George in Rural Crafts, Super X Country and Eqclusive to your list of must visits!!**

3. Drinks. Drinks matter. And not the alcoholic kind. I’m notorious for the amount of water I drink (as in, nowhere near enough), but when you’re at an event and you’re running around, it’s really easy to get dehydrated. Add in some tea, coffee or alcohol and you’ll find you have a banging headache and a bad mood way too early in the day. My best bit of advice is bottled water. Get a bottle or two and pop them in your bag and drink them. I hate having headaches and find they make me feel really rubbish and definitely hinder my enjoyment of the day. This changes the game. Obviously get other drinks too when you’re there, but you know you have a supply!

4. Food. Food is a must. Make a plan to eat. There are amazing stands there but I tend to buy some food to take (almost a picnic!) and also buy something delicious there as a treat. The last few years I have found myself eating on the move, and having a sandwich and some crisps in my bag has been a big plus. It doesn’t mean I’m not visiting the amazing stands there, but it stops me having a low when I get super hungry and I’m in the middle of something.

5. Footwear. PLEASE PLEASE wear good footwear. I’m wearing my Fairfax & Favor Explorers but will also take my Rudds in case its really wet. Both of these boots are comfy, robust and durable. Please PLEASE don’t go for flip flops or heels if you’re planning to walk the XC course. Please. Come on. That’s crazy bananas.

6. Weather. Take everything you need for all the seasons. Sunscreen, sunglasses, hat, wellies, waterproofs, coat, etc. You don’t want to get burnt or soaked.

7. Cars. Remember where you left your car. I now take a picture of where I’ve parked the damn thing with something obvious that I can find again in the background. You’re speaking to someone who lost their car for an hour at the NEC. Always take a pic or something else that will help you find it again.

8. Bags. Take a good bag. Backpacks are great, but I’m taking my Fairfax & Favor Windsor because it has plenty of space, it’s comfortable to carry and I love it. Take something with lots of room for your essentials.

What tips did I miss? What stands are on your must-see list? I’d love to know!

 

Behind… bespoke cross country colours from Super X Country

bespoke cross country coloursA little while ago, I wrote an article for Horse & Hound all about what cross country colours mean to the people who ride in them. With insight from Paul Tapner, Mary King, David Doel and Nicki Strong, the piece attracted lots of attention and was also fascinating to write. Cross country colours, in my mind at least, cross over into branding. But how on earth do you get ones that reflect what you want?! And how do you stand out from the crowd? The answer lies in bespoke cross country colours.

Enter Super X Country

Becci Harrold runs Super X Country and is also an accomplished event rider in her own right. She started Super X Country in 2010 when she couldn’t find any base layers that suited her taste.

“Before there was a very very slim choice,” said Becci. “There were no online XC colours back then, so it was a case of turning up to a tack shop and seeing what they had. I was horrified when my mum pulled out a heavy, dull, dark rugby shirt! We put it back on the rail and went home to design my own. I was 16 when I did my first event and wore my own colours that I had made from the very start. It was only when I left A levels at 18 I decided to start the business as I had more time and knowledge having done business and textiles!”

Now, Super X Country offers a staggering array of highly customisable designs. At the time of writing this (so, depending on when you read it, the numbers might change!) there are 19 breathable base layer colours to choose from that can be customised with stars, spots and checks in 31 different colours (and, if you select a ‘burst’ pattern, you can have up to three different colours in the design). In addition, there’s a rose gold and a unicorn set. And I haven’t even mentioned the custom hat silks…

Do you find people pick similar colour combinations for their bespoke cross country colours?

“When I post a picture on social media of a set, that usually becomes the favourite for many people for a week or two, and then something different shows up and then that takes over,” said Becci. “It goes in waves! Some people are deadset on their favourite colour but I’m finding now that many people are influenced by a good looking set that I might have put together or another customer”

Becci has some amazing plans for the future and will be appearing at a number of events this season and beyond. In addition, she’s incredibly active on social media – you can follow Super X Country on Instagram, or Facebook, and obviously you can visit the Super X Country website to see the range of amazing designs available, to give you inspiration to create your own bespoke cross country colours.

How not to sell on social media

How not to sell on social mediaDo you want to have a coaching session with me?

In short, I have just committed what I believe to be a cardinal sin in terms of social media, content marketing… actually any form of PR at all. I have committed this to illustrate a point- it’s horrible on every level. And if it made you feel half as uncomfortable as I felt typing it, then I apologise.

How not to sell on social media

If you didn’t see anything wrong with my direct approach, then you have a little bit to learn about social media. But worry not. Because you’re here now and we’ll get it sorted. You’re going to find out how not to sell on social media. And you’re not alone if you think this is OK. It’s not, but you’re not on your own.

So… social…

I’ve heard both Gary Vaynerchuk and Dan Meredith use an analogy that perfectly describes why the above is wrong. But it’s not really ‘PG’ content so we’ll go a different route. Imagine you are at a bar, or a restaurant, or a party. You walk over to someone you see and out of nowhere ask them to buy from you or do something to help you. Just because you want them to. They don’t know you. You haven’t added any value to them or their lives. You haven’t even had the courtesy to introduce yourself. How do you think that encounter will go? Do you think they’ll be reaching for their purses and wallets while asking you if you accept cards? Or do you think you’re more likely to get told where to go? Or laughed at? Or, depending what you ask, a slap in the face? I know where I’d put my money…

See, there’s a reason why you can’t just ask for what you want. It’s not socially acceptable. The clue is in the name. I mean… it’s flipping rude! Social media isn’t about saying ‘I have this – buy it’. An advert can do that. Social media is about being sociable. Finding out about your fans and followers and what makes them tick. It’s creating interesting content and tips to help support their goals and objectives. It’s about actually caring about your audience. It’s about delivering more than they could hope for and asking for nothing. You should look to make friends of your fans and followers. To forge real connections and to actually engage with them in an authentic way. And if you don’t want to, don’t be surprised to get slapped in the face. Metaphorically or otherwise!

How do you sell on social media then? If you can’t ask?!

You can ask, but you can’t ask all the time, and you can’t ask without putting in any effort. Treat your fans and followers as friends. Share things you think they might like to read or watch, create content that might be useful to them, tell them where you’re going and share information about new things you’re doing. Create polls, how tos, videos, memes… whatever appeals to your audience and strengthens your brand. You can say you have things for sale. You can share news of products and services. You can do all these things, but they mustn’t be your sole online strategy… because it won’t deliver.

If you’re looking for a little help with how to sell on social media (or how not to sell on social media!), you might find Five Ways To Grow Your Equestrian Business On Social Media a good read. Enjoy 🙂

When to pay to boost your Facebook post

When to pay to boost your Facebook postDo you see posts with the word ‘sponsored’ on popping up in your News Feed more and more? I do. I’m going to state the obvious here (I know, and I apologise), but this means that the creator of that content has paid to show that post to you. Maybe I’ve been noticing it more lately, but I’m beginning to wonder if Facebook’s new News Feed changes have caused this surge? Now, I’m in no way against giving a post a boost or placing an ad with Facebook. Quite the opposite. But what I will say is that although you can throw a LOT of money at Facebook, it will only generate the right impact when you’ve spent it on the right content. To help with this, here are my tips to help you decided when to pay to boost your Facebook post.

When to pay to boost your Facebook post

Some people say that you should never boost a Facebook post. There’s some good logic behind their reasons and if you don’t want to, don’t. I, however, do boost the odd post. I haven’t actually boosted any posts for a few months now on my own page. This is not because I have some objection, far from it, I just like to use my money wisely (even if it is £2!), and I haven’t felt the need to pay to boost a post for a bit. However, I want to share with you the thought process I apply when I boost a post. You don’t have to agree, you might have another method, but this is what I do. I would love to know how you decide when to pay to boost your Facebook post.

  1. I boost posts that do well organically. Generally I only boost posts that have started to gather momentum on their own. I use this as a test. Again, I use the word generally when I say that if a post does well organically, it’ll do well when boosted.
  2. I boost posts that have a point. I wouldn’t boost a post that didn’t have a point. But then I don’t tend to post that much that doesn’t have a point. I like each post to have some value in some way, as I for one am tired of self indulgent posts cluttering up my News Feed.
  3. I boost posts I want my followers to see. I boost a post if I want my followers to see it too. I would run an ad if I was looking to target new people and if the content was more of an advert nature.
  4. I boost posts that are informative (well, that’s the aim!). If I was creating something more like a straight advert, I wouldn’t post it on my feed, so I wouldn’t boost it, I would do an advert.
  5. I boost posts that are time sensitive. Not all the time, but something that is time sensitive is more likely to get a boost because I want people to see it quickly and don’t have time to recycle.
  6. I boost posts that I think people will engage with. Point 1 should have proved this, but if people start engaging the organic reach will increase too, making my boost do more.
  7. I boost posts when I just want a lift in a post’s reach. Facebook Ads have a lot more options and functionality so if I have more of a campaign in mind, I would invest the extra time in placing an ad as I would be able to make my ad style content work harder by utilising different styles of ad, objectives, etc. etc.
  8. I boost posts that meet the ad guidelines. Too much text, for example, might work in a normal post, but if I boost a post with too much text on the image (according to Facebook), my money isn’t working as hard as it could be.

…and I tend to boost posts for short periods of time… and for not much money. The kind of content I boost is usually blog content or day of the week style content.

When do you pay to post a Facebook post? Have I missed any criteria from the list above? I’d love to hear your thoughts on it.

 

 

A few minutes with… Hannah Moule- The Business Barn

The Business Barn

Hannah Moule (left), Rosie Hopkins – Business Manager (right)

This week’s ‘a few minutes with…’ is special for a few reasons. Not only are we speaking to Hannah Moule, founder of The Business Barn, but I am also delighted to announce that I am working with the company as their digital marketing partner. This means that I will be providing them with content in this area to help support the users of the service. And I am very excited to be involved. It was a huge honour to be asked and I’m very excited to see The Business Barn grow and develop. So, without further ado, over to Hannah…

Who are you?

Hannah Moule

What’s your business called?

The Business Barn

When did it start?

We launched the concept of The Business Barn at the 2017 Farm Business Innovation Show. However, we have officially launched the business this January (2018)

If you could sum your business up in one sentence, what would it be?

An online resource providing inspiration and business advice for diversifying farmers and rural business owners.

Tell us a bit more about your business – what makes you different and what was the idea behind it?

The Business Barn is a website dedicated to providing inspiration and business advice for those looking to diversify their farming enterprise or start a rural business. My background is in rural surveying and I was frequently being asked  where to find specific resources and advice. There is lots of information out there, but there was not one central place to find rural specific information; hence the reason for The Business Barn.

What is your favourite part of the website?

The opportunities section, which is designed to be a platform for the industry to share business opportunities to the benefit of the agricultural and rural sectors.

Who designed your logo? 

In the initial stages, a freelance graphic designer

One thing we might not know about you?

I used to be an auctioneer and have a pet farm tortoise

Favourite podcast?

Rock ‘n’ Roll Farming Podcast

Best business book?

The John Nix Pocketbook

Best advice you’ve ever been given? 

‘Do the job well and the rewards will come.’

Favourite quote

“It’s nice to be important but important to be nice.”

Business Brands you love 

Innocent branding

Who do you admire? 

Beatrix Potter for her determination to buy land and farms with the wealth she built herself

Richard Branson for genuine entrepreneurship

Quick fire questions…..

Dogs or cats? Dogs

Blogs or vlogs? Blogs

Favourite blog/vlog? Deliciously Ella

Tea of coffee? Tea

Sweet or savoury?  Savoury

Where can we find you online? 

Facebook The Business Barn

Twitter @businessbarn_uk

The Business BarnWebsite www.thebusinessbarn.co.uk

Caracal Equestrian – Stock – Advent Calendar Competition

Caracal EquestrianToday’s advent calendar giveaway is another treat – this time from Caracal Equestrian! The lovely Ailsa, the lady behind Caracal, has given me a beautiful stock to giveaway, in a stunning floral print.

Why am I giving away a stock from Caracal Equestrian?

Caracal Equestrian is a young British equestrian brand that creates really beautiful pieces of show and general equestrian apparel. The company is probably best known for its show and stock shirts, that are made in Britain and combine coloured cottons with classic whites to make beautiful products. There’s a huge range available including stripes, florals, the new range using fabric designed by Robin Roadnight (these pieces are soooo beautiful!), polka dots… the list is nearly endless. What’s more, Caracal offers a bespoke service. This can be in terms of the fit or in the combination of fabrics used. I think Caracal’s products are really special and combine modern shapes and etiquette with a bit of fun and colour… so I love ’em!

Why do I like the stock from Caracal Equestrian?

What competition outfit is complete without a stock? Exactly. Adding a bit of colour is a great way to add a bit of personality to a competition outfit, and a stock, I think, is a great way to do this. The stock, created using the same fabric as the Anabelle stock shirt, is just so pretty. It uses aquas, greens, pinks and whites in a lovely floral pattern, and really would be a joy to wear. It’s also really practical with the slit that allows the stock to be posted through.

Would you like to win this stock from Caracal Equestrian?

Of course you do! I have one to win… and the competition is only running on the day that this blog is published… so get in quick! If you read this afterwards and you love Caracal Equestrian’s style, just pop on over to the Caracal website and have a look around. However, if you’re in time, all you need to do it pop on over to my Rhea Freeman PR Facebook page, watch the video that will be pinned to the top today and enter. That’s it! Of course, I’d love it if you’d tell your friends by sharing the post.

I hope you enjoy my advent calendar competition – best of luck!