Help for sponsored riders

A little while ago, I offered a Skype session to help the End of Season Event fundraise for a great cause. The ‘offer’ was an hour’s Skype consultation to help anyone with their PR, marketing, social media, website, blogging, video production… whether they were just starting out in the industry, had an established business they needed help with or were a rider interested in how to be more attractive to sponsors. The lot was won and I’m looking forward to helping the lady who bagged the session…but it got me thinking…is this kind of service something that riders could benefit from?

I’ve written a couple of blogs about sponsorship and sponsored riders, both of which were based on my personal experiences. I stand by everything that I said in these blogs. I truly believe it’s the rider’s job to be attractive to the company…and it annoys and disappoints me each time I receive a Facebook message on a page I admin with the SAME recycled copied and pasted information that has about as much appeal as a gone off tuna sandwich (I don’t like tuna anyway, so gone off tuna is a whole lot worse!). Now, don’t get me wrong, I do work with some good sponsored riders who seem to get it. They have a website, they come to ME with ideas (I love that, it makes me very, very happy), they send me information that I can use on social media for my clients, they respond promptly. The key aspect here is that we work together. I know what my clients want to achieve and I work with a rider to make this happen. The emphasis is on them though. I’ll do my best to keep everything ticking along, but I’m not planning to write up a blog for someone when they should have done it. Why should I? I’ll edit it, I’ll pop in the links, I’ll sort out the images, I’ll do all the work for my client, but I should NOT be creating the content too…that’s the job of the sponsored rider. I work with a number  of different brands and a number of different riders (and have worked with many more!) and feel that presenting yourself correctly, doing what you say and knowing what the company is looking for is not just important, it’s essential. But, how would someone who hasn’t been on this side of the fence know all those things? The chances are they wouldn’t…so what can they do?

The answer is to learn. If you want to drive a car, you go for lessons. If you want sponsorship, you need to learn how it works. Most riders can’t afford a PR to hold their hand at every step of the way, but they can afford something like a Skype consultation to chat about their situation, their USP, people they could target and how they can approach them. Of course, the emphasis is, again, on the rider…but so it should be. Hand holding is fine and, let’s be honest, that’s how we all start in whatever job or hobby we do…it’s almost like the lead rein part before the real fun begins. So, here’s my idea. Would a service that provides riders looking for sponsorship with the info they need to get started be of use? I’ll be honest, I’ve toyed with this idea before, but I was chatting to someone a little while ago who said ‘yes, that’s a great idea and very much needed’, and I’ve been letting the idea…what’s the word…percolate…for a while. So, here’s my offer. If you’re a rider, producer, event, yard or similar looking at how to make yourself and your business more appealing, I’d like to hear from you. I’m thinking about pricing and exactly what a package would involve/need to involve…but your input would be very, very useful…and there might even be a discount in it for you…please drop me an email at rhea@rheafreemanpr.co.uk and let’s get chatting!

How to make your BETA International even better!

We’re fast approaching BETA International 2015, THE equestrian trade event where the good and great of the equestrian world gather to see what’s going on in the trade…and what we can look forward to over the coming months. It takes place at the NEC in February and although there’s often snow (or if not actual snow, the threat of it), it’s a fun, warm, busy event that always leaves me a mixture of exhausted and excited.

Whether you’re going as an exhibitor, a retailer or a member of the trade, you will come away with something, whether it’s an idea, excitement about a new innovation, a new contact, or a list of products that you want to stock. Many retailers use BETA International as the place to place their orders for the coming season as manufacturers use the show to showcase what’s coming up. Many stands also have some cracking show offers to save money. Actually, attending the show is likely to save you a few pounds as instead of travelling all over the country to see suppliers, they’re all under one roof…a few feet away from each other.

I’d call myself a seasoned BETA International attendee. I go each year to support my clients who exhibit, to catch up with magazines, to see what’s coming up in the trade, to network, to catch up with friends and to be inspired. For those who are new to BETA International, whether it’s the first time they’ve attended as a visitor or the first time they’ve taken a stand, I have a few top tips…obviously some of these apply more to stands than visitors and visa versa…

* Footwear – yes, footwear is important. Even if you’re on a stand all day and not marching around the halls, your feet will ache. Actually, everything will ache. Wear comfortable footwear. Honestly. You’ll regret it if you don’t.

* Hydrate – I don’t know what it is about the NEC, but I always end up with a dry throat and feeling a bit ‘urgh’ towards the end of the day. I blame the air con. And the near constant chatting. So make sure you’re armed with a bottle or water at all times. Yes, it’s not terribly ‘PR’ to be drinking water rather than champagne but a) the Ab-Fab champagne swilling persona isn’t true…and if you find a PR that’s partially drunk a 12noon on a Sunday, they probably aren’t the kind of person you want to work with b) water doesn’t make you feel odd (as per alcohol and caffeinated drinks..well, after the sixth one) – it helps enormously and is very easy to come by c) BETA International can be a bit of a marathon as there’s always so much to see and you’ll be walking miles in the day…water is the way forward. Honest.

* Lip salve – lip balm, lip butter, whatever it’s called, take some with you. Again, I think the air con’s to blame, but my lips always dry out…and a bit of lip balm/salve fixes it.

* Plan – get your ticket before BETA International. It’s a trade only show, so consumers can’t attend, but if you fit into one of the categories, you should be OK. You need to register here.

* Take in the fashion show – there really is nothing like it. If you enjoy people dancing around with whips, it’ll be right up your street.

* Take a notepad and somewhere to keep business cards safe – you will be given various business cards from people, and losing them is SOOO annoying. You can get little business card holders, or just take a notepad and staple the business card of the person you’ve been dealing with to the top of your page.

* Bags – there’s no doubt that you’ll collect leaflets and promotional material as you go around…so take a comfortable, easy to carry bag…and be careful about what you take. One year I was given a HUGE paper bag from a company. I ambled off, very pleased about it and what could be inside it and you know what…it was empty. Completely empty. I quickly binned it. It might also pay to sit and sift through your gathered leaflets and brochures a few times during the day to give you the chance to get rid of the stuff you don’t need and reduce everything into one bag. You’ll thank me for this tip when your fingers are not sore and red and you STILL have to walk back to the car. Honest.

* Phone – your phone is a useful asset…although not always in the way you think. Yes, you can make calls on your phone, but, in my opinion, that’s secondary to this. Take a picture of where you’ve parked your car and the car park you’re in. After losing the car for the best part of an hour in the pouring rain a few years ago, I always take a picture of it and the car park sign that’s the closest.

* Have a plan – use the BETA International website (www.beta-int.com) to plan who you want to see before you get there. All the exhibitors are listed, so you can see who you HAVE to see and then make another list of who you’d like to see. I’m 99% sure that there’s a floorplan in ETN’s February issue, which is a HUGE help. Or you can pick up a copy of ETN/BETA International guide when you get there.

* Do you need to make an appointment? Some companies are obsessed with appointments, especially if you want to see a particular person at a company. Drop them an email/call them before BETA International to see how they’re working this year. If you need to book appointments, make sure you don’t book them too close together, give yourself some breathing room in between. This means that if you get stuck into something, you don’t have to run half way through and, if you have time to spare, you can take in some more of the show/refill at the cafe before your next appointment.

* Tell your customers – if you have a stand at BETA International make sure EVERYONE knows. Put it on your website. Put it on your social media platforms. Send out a newsletter about it. Paint a herd of cows to show you’re going (OK, do NOT do the latter if they’re a) not your cows and b) the paint is not suitable for cows). MAKE SURE PEOPLE KNOW.

* Offer an incentive – if you’re at BETA International, offer an incentive for people to come and see you on your stand. It could be a corking show offer, it could be entry into a competition in exchange for a business card, it could be something completely off the wall and interesting, it could be sweets. Whatever you do, do something. Saying ‘we’re here’, isn’t good enough. If you’re launching a new product, tell people.

* Speak to the press – if you’re at BETA International and you have something new and exciting to show the world, why not invite the press to your stand to see it? You could have an open invite or organise a little launch and invite whoever you want.

* Have fun – yes, it might be work, but BETA International can be great fun too. They have a fab demonstration area where you can see real horses showing off new kit. One year, War Horse was walking around the place…and one year there was a man modelling sand into a horse scultpure in one of the aisles (it was amazing actually!). See the BETA International website (www.beta-int.com) to find out what’s going on.

 

My must-see places…

* If you’re a retailer – you HAVE to go to the Trilanco stand (J7.1) as the UK’s leading wholesaler, you’d be mad not to…and they really are the friendliest bunch around.

* For your footwear needs, make sure you visit the Tuffa Footwear stand (N6.4).

* The fashion show – you HAVE to go to the fashion show…even if you can’t stay for the full event, go and see some of it.

* The New Products Gallery – full or interesting new products from established brands and new kids on the block.

It’s 2015! Happy New Year, etc. etc…

Yes, it’s 2015…and my ‘Happy New Year’ post is a bit, well, late…so sorry about that. Rest assured that although late by some 12 days, it’s a heartfelt Happy New Year!

The New Year, I think, is an interesting time. I’m not talking about New Year’s Eve when people seem to seize the opportunity to drink their body weight in alcohol and make a complete fools of themselves, I’m talking about the hopes and ‘resolutions’ that people make for the New Year. I’ve actually given this a lot of thought recently, not just as the clock struck 12 on 31st December, but in the following weeks too. I was chatting to my niece about New Year’s Resolutions at the weekend. She’s 10, but actually speaks quite a bit of sense (not all the time, just in case she’s reading this!). Her resolution was to ‘be more generally awesome’, and I have to say I kind of like that. An all encompassing ‘be a better version of you’ seemed rather good and uncomplicated. I didn’t follow up with the next question, that I’d ask any friend or even client, which is ‘and how are you going to do that then?’. See, that’s the interesting bit of the puzzle, isn’t it. The how. And, another interesting point, what stops us from ‘being more generally awesome’ on any other day of the year? Is it the thought that we can’t, or the thought that we might not, or the memories of previous things that stop us from just kicking on? New Year is a good excuse to have a vision, a plan, not just for ourselves but actually for our businesses too. But so is the start of any other day of the year. It’s a new day as much as the 1st January is a new year, isn’t it?

So, now for the how. How are you going to achieve your resolution. Let’s just take the ‘being more generally awesome’ example…because, let’s be honest, it’s a pretty great resolution to have. How can you be more awesome? How can your business be more awesome? And what does that mean to you? Would being more awesome involve stressing less? Getting more done in day? Having a plan? Being less tied to the desk and more free to enjoy your life? Is it getting the work/life balance fixed? For your business is it getting more people to know about you? Is it having a plan for your social media? Is it going to more events? Is it selling more product? When you’ve narrowed down what you want to achieve, it’s easier to pull out the threads and see how you can achieve this. If you need help, in whatever aspect of your life or business, whether this is PR support or even how to make your iPhone receive emails when you’re out and about or how to manage your stress levels, then crack on and do it. We all need a little help sometimes. It might be that a Youtube tutorial fixes it. It might be that you need to employ the help of an expert or consultant in some field. It might mean that you have to change habits and form new ones…and that takes some doing.

So, here’s to a New Year where we can all be more ‘generally awesome’…

Tis the season

First of all, I must apologise for the gap between this blog and the two previous ones…I blame Christmas. Entirely.

In the world of PR, Christmas starts in about August, you know, when you’re sat in shorts (OK, I don’t wear shorts, but let’s say t-shirt), you’re sporting a shade of lobster and the ground resembles concrete. The issue is, it doesn’t end until, well, about now for the most part, and Christmas Eve for the bits and bobs…just as the actual Christmas arrives, when you have to be sociable to people you avoid all year long and the stress about what to buy for who/realise you haven’t bought anything for anyone but you have festive attire for the dogs, takes over. Print media does work ahead, of course it does, but with digital becoming stronger and stronger all the time, it’s not over until there’s a fat, jolly bloke trying to squeeze himself down your chimney, to steal your sherry, mince pies and carrots. It’s not a relaxing time of year, but it is an exciting one in our world – when campaigns you’ve been plotting start to pay off for all concerned…a lot of work goes into Christmas, it’s the key time of the year for so many businesses, and people are foolish to ignore this. I’ve seen some corking campaigns this season and been involved in a few too – you don’t need to give the contents of your shop to get somewhere – just think about your fans and what you think they’d like- what would appeal to them? And, until Christmas Eve, it’s not too late to try something on social media or online…seize the moment. Embrace your inner child and try your very best to embrace Christmas…it could pay dividends.

I’ve been posting some Christmas Crackers on my Facebook page if you’re lacking festive inspiration. There’s more to come too, so do like the page

Now, before I leave you for a little while, I wanted to draw your attention to something I’m involved with – when I say involved with, I mean that I’ve donated something towards…I can’t (and won’t) take any credit for the organisational aspect because that’s been a mammoth task that Alexis and Nikki need a big pat on the back for (well, a big drink for, but ‘pat on the back’ is a more accepted term). What am I talking about? The End of Season Event silent auction. The auction is raising money for Friends of Picu, the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit in Southampton Hospital. It’s a cause that’s very close to the hearts of the organisers of the ball, and I was pleased to be able to help. I’ve donated an hour’s Skype consultation, ideal for riders looking at how to manage their own promotion and small businesses too. There are lots of great lots – you can buy Ben Hobday (well, I think you can…don’t quote me on that!), win lessons with Olympians, get a signed Mirrors for Training Stable Mirror…there are 44 lots in total – so get bidding! Find out more here.

How to keep sponsors happy

I’ve been blown away by the lovely positive response that my little blog how to be a sponsored rider received – it was nice to have so many people read it, share it, talk about and, hopefully, take something from it. I regularly read tweets and Facebook posts from people moaning that companies in the equestrian industry don’t sponsor and support riders and, from the other side of the fence, the vast majority of riders give them no reason to want to be involved. There has to be a payback, a return-on-investment…and a lot of riders simply don’t give this. Actually, the same can apply to events and competitions requesting sponsorship, but I digress. Before everyone leaps around and says that I’m being negative about the whole industry – rest assured that I am not. I love the equestrian industry and there are a number of riders and a number of events that do an exceptional job for their sponsors. They really do go over and above. But there are many that do not…and, in many cases, it wouldn’t take all that much to make a big difference.

Anyway, as a sequel to last week’s blog (think of the Harry Potter series, but with a little less magic), I thought I should do a follow up blog on top tips to keep sponsors happy. This is not a definite guide and lots more can be done if you just think outside the box a little. So…

 

1. Do what you say. If you say you’re going to do x, y and z…DO IT. Don’t wait to be reminded. If you promised someone that you’d send regular reports, pictures, products reviews…do it. And, a personal bugbear…if you send someone a picture, make sure that they can use it. If it’s a professional snap, permission needs to be obtained BEFORE it can be used. You do the legwork and get written permission. Please.

2. Go over and above. Promise what you can easily deliver and then apply yourself as to how you can do even more. Be innovative and use your initiative.

3. Wear the kit. If you’ve been given embroidered and branded kit to wear then please, PLEASE wear it. Wear it at shows and competitions, wear it when competing…wear it as much as you can!

4. Recommend what you use. There are some great forums available and places where people are asking for advice and help with equestrian products, and there are limitless opportunities on social media to promote the products and companies you work with and love. Mention them on social media, make a film showing how you use the kit, take a picture at a show of the product in action, tell your friends…the company will be sponsoring you to increase its exposure, help it do this.

5. Make the link. Can you have a code that friends/students/fellow riders can use when they order to show that the introduction came from you? Speak to the company and see if they can supply you with a promo code or something that perhaps gives a small discount/free P&P but shows the lead. It shows ROI and will help you to be more of an asset at the same time as increasing sales.

6. Give feedback. If you have a product that you love – let the company know. If you have a product that you feel could be improved – let them know. Feedback is an essential part of any business and allows people to assess and adjust as needed. Provide the necessary feedback.

7. Be squeaky clean. Your reputation is something that you have to protect. If you lost everything tomorrow, it would be your reputation that could remake you or break you. Keep your social media profiles clean, remember your manners at competitions and think about how your actions could change how an outsider could view you and your brand. If your actions compromise your brand, something has gone wrong and you could be compromising your sponsorships. I have been astounded (not in a good way) at some of the things that people say on social media. I’m not saying remove your personality, far from it, but launching attacks on others in a PUBLIC FORUM is not acceptable. If you haven’t got anything nice to say, just don’t. There are times when everyone wants to scream and tell the world all about how x has stitched them up or y has copied them or z is clearly out of their tiny mind of thinking what they think…but social media isn’t the way to vent. Call a friend, go and muck out, go to the gym/run to vent your frustrations. Some of the things I have seen on social media from riders has cemented the fact that I would never want a brand I was responsible for to be involved with them.

8. Offer your services. If you have a quiet time out of season, why not say you’re willing to give a free lesson or two for a competition, work on a campaign, do a Q and A on Twitter, offer a yard tour or be involved with a photoshoot? Approach your contact and see if they’re interested. It’s soul destroying contacting all your brand ambassadors and asking for their assistance with a project and having one get back to you. It can make you feel like you’re asking for their first born when, actually, you’re asking for a bit of their time to do something that will promote your brand as well as theirs.

9. See the association. Being associated with a good brand is good for your personal brand too. If you can approach other, non conflicting companies and say ‘for x I’ve done this, that and the other’ it makes you far more attractive. Much  better than ‘yeah – I wear their saddlecloth when I remember’…

10. Communicate. Even if you have nothing of interest to say, make sure you drop your sponsor an email explaining what you’ve been up to. Maybe your horse is out of work because of x, y and z and you haven’t been to any shows, but let them know. They may have an idea that could turn a negative into a positive or, at the very least, they’ll know that you are still thinking of them and haven’t fallen into a black hole! You don’t have to write reams each time you contact them, just a quick email between classes at a show, or even a vlog that they can use on their social media that you’ve recorded through your phone. Technology is there to be used and harnessed to make our lives easier…so harness yours.

 

Sponsorship is a two way thing but, as the sponsored rider, the onus is on you to do what you say. I know that you’re very busy, and that’s fine… but the chances are that you will have agreed to something in order to gain a company’s support, so uphold your end  of the bargain. If you’re too busy to work with the company, don’t approach them in the first place. Go over and above and really show what you can deliver. From small acorns do mighty oaks grow… and you never know where a sponsorship can end if you give it the right amount of attention.

How to be a sponsored rider

Would you like to be a sponsored rider? Read on…

Through my clients, I receive many, many, many sponsorship requests each week from people asking for rider sponsorship. Some sound like interesting propositions, some leave me open mouthed by the time I’ve scanned the first sentence. Being aligned with the right kind of a rider CAN be good for a company, it can be really good for a company, and I’m lucky enough to say that I’ve seen some of these great associations in action. However, these great connections are not common, they’re like rare gems that should be cherished, and I really don’t think the majority of riders asking for sponsorship understand what they’re asking for and why they get no after no after no after no. So, I thought I’d put together some thoughts for consideration that might help you increase your chances if you’re asking for sponsorship or, if you’re a company, might help you get the most from an association…

1. First impressions count. Sending someone a message through Facebook isn’t the best start to a relationship, especially if there’s an obvious way to contact the company through their website! Sir/madam is rather impersonal…get the name of the marketing manager or marketing director…put some effort in. Also be aware that messaging a number of Facebook pages at the same time is probably not going to end too well as a) you might find a PR admins a number of pages and sees the same message two/three/four times and b) you might get confused with who you’re writing to…I’ve received Facebook messages mentioning the wrong company. Can you guess what the response was?!

2. Why are you an asset? Saying that you enjoy riding and you have done well at your local show isn’t enough. I like Audi R8s. I think they’re really nice. I have spoken to people about my love for Audi R8s…but would I ask Audi to give me an R8 to use, for free, because I like them and I’d park it in Sainsbury’s once a week? No, no I wouldn’t. I’ve had people offering less exposure than that in exchange for the contents of a warehouse.

3. And you want?! Don’t be too quick making your demands. Think about what you can offer the company before you decide on the products that you want them to give you! What value will you add to their marketing? How are you going to get their name out there (wearing a branded saddlecloth is not enough!)? How are you going to promote them? There are some riders (at all levels) who do an excellent job, and some that make me want to cry. THINK ABOUT IT.

4. It’s only product. The chances of you getting paid for your support are slim unless you’re one of the top riders in the UK. BUT product does have a value, and although the RRP isn’t what it’ll cost a company to make, it is still costing them, so don’t be ungrateful.

5. Think outside the box. Really think about how you can be different to the other 100+ requests that hit someone’s inbox or land on their desk. Reading the same kind of letter offering the same kind of thing isn’t very exciting and is very forgettable.

6. Be honest. If I receive an email or letter that vaguely interests me, I go to Google and I do my research. If you say you’re the next Charlotte Dujardin or Mary King then you’d better have done something to suggest that you are!

7. Think about what you say. You’ve heard of Facebook? Well, if you’re looking to represent a company, you’d better make sure that your personal profile portrays you in a good light too! Yep…it’s amazing what you can find out on the internet. Say you’ve approached a company about representing their brand and you’ve explained how you’re a great role model for young people because of X, Y and Z. Now, imagine the company’s marketing manager has a look on Facebook and sees pictures of you at a party in a drunk state. Not many people like to align reputable brands with drunkenness. I’m not saying don’t have a nice time, but think about what goes on your public profile. Actually, that’s a tip for life too. Employers aren’t too keen on that kind of thing either!

8. Do you know the product? If you’ve never used the product a company makes, then don’t bother knocking on their door. A ‘I love your product and would like to use it’ just screams ‘I’d like free stuff…I don’t care who makes it!’

9. Read it back. People make mistakes, but checking back over what you’ve written and correcting the obvious spelling and grammatical mistakes will improve your chances of the person actually reading your letter/email.

See these pointers as a place to start…it’s not a complete guide, but it’s certainly a good starting point!

How to ‘build’ your website

If you’ve ever wondered how to build a website for your business, we’ve put together a quick guide of points to consider. It’s not a complete list, but it’s one that’s been created from our own experiences, from building our own website and working on websites for our clients. Websites are important to any business, and that includes any equestrian business. If you’re looking for something, whether it’s an equestrian PR and marketing professional (you don’t need to look any further, you’re home!), a riding instructor, the best supplement for your horse, or a bespoke bridle, the chances are that you’ll pop your question into Google. Google’s great, we love Google, but Google can only pull up websites and pages that exist on the web. If you business doesn’t have a website, how does Google and, by extension, the person looking for you, know that a) you exist or b) where to find you!

Here are our top tips on how to build your own website…or, at least, how to find the right person to help you…

1. Do a little research, but don’t let the numbers scare you. Websites can cost a fortune…but they don’t have to. We don’t think you need to sell a limb to get a really impressive website. There are lots of options- you can use a platform like WordPress and buy a template for pounds and do all the work yourself, or you can speak to a friendly website designer (we have one that we work with and we can help you!) and ask if they’ll customise a template for you. Or you can give the whole job to them and sit back and admire the view. There are lots of options.

2. Make sure you’re in control. Gone are the days when a web wizard would need to update your website! Not only was this expensive as each time you wanted a tweak, you needed to pay, but you’d also need to form an orderly queue along with all your web designer’s other customers. Let’s be honest. No one likes to queue.

3. Take inspiration from others. We’re not saying copy. That’s not what we mean at all. What we’re saying is observe what other people do…what do you like? What do you hate? Make notes and pass these onto your designer or keep them in mind when you start yourself. Listing things you hate can be as helpful as things you love!

4. Make a list. If you are approaching a designer, you’ll need a brief. The designer will base their price on your brief. Each time you chance your mind and deviate from the brief, you could get an extra bill. Take your time putting your website brief together…and speak to people whose opinion you value too…it’s always good to have a sounding board!

5. Pictures. Pictures can really add an extra ‘je ne sais quoi’ to a website…but don’t worry if you don’t have your own extensive library! There are some great sites out there like iStock and Shutterstock that allow you to buy really good quality images for a few pounds, depending on what you want to use them for.

6. Get writing! Providing clear, concise and informative copy is essential for any website. If this isn’t your area of expertise, you can either get in touch with a copywriter, or you can draft what you want and get someone to proof it for you.

7. Don’t be afraid! When you think your website is pretty close to perfection, don’t be afraid to press go and get it online. There will be bits you want to amend. There will be niggles that need straightening out…but you’re not going to know about these until you kick on and get people testing the site. You don’t have to announce your new site to the world to start with, but get some friends on it so they can have a look and iron out any problems.

 

If you need any help with your website, why not contact us? We can help you with all the points above, point you in the right direction if you want to ‘go it alone’, and work with you and our web designer to create something super special!

Welcome to our shiny new website!

We’re very excited to be able to show you our new website – we hope you like it!

We’ve been working on this for some time now, tweaking and adjusting it to get it just so…but there’s a point when you need to bite the bullet and stop adjusting…and this is the point we’re now at!

On this new site, you’ll find examples of our work, what we do, testimonials from our customers and the trade, and lots and lots more. We hope to keep adding to the site as we see fit, and utilise this, the blog area, to keep you updated on news, views and, also, tips and info that you might find useful for your business.

We’re proud to work in the equestrian industry and to work with the companies that we do. To us, it’s all about the client, it’s all about relationships…and we look forward to getting to know better too!